Australian export plan delayed

New fee system for biosecurity and certification will now be implemented in December

Small-scale Australian horticultural producers and exporters could feel the pinch from a proposed restructure of the country’s export certification and biosecurity costs, according to David Minnis, chairman of the Australian Horticulture Exporters Association.

The Australian Government has moved the start date for the new scheme from 1 November to 1 December, according to the Weekly Times, although the final terms of the new structure have not yet been released. A proposed model, believed to be favoured by the government, would see the introduction of a three-tier system.

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Under the model, a middle tier rate of A$3 per tonne would be applied to citrus, apple, pear, banana and nut exports to cover certification and biosecurity costs. A fee of A$5 per tonne would be applied to products in the third tier, which includes stonefruit, grapes and berries. The first tier is made up of commodities such as grains and forest products, and would attract a fee of A$0.20 per tonne.

Minnis said the proposed system could put smaller export categories under pressure.

“It’s in everyone’s interest to keep airfreight viable, whether it be for big or small volumes,” Minnis told the Weekly Times. “If boutique exporters are facing excessive charges then they will cease to exist.”

Minnis said the added charges would be most telling over the weekends, when suppliers are already forced to pay penalty rates to have inspectors examine their fruit.

mall-scale Australian horticultural producers and exporters could feel the pinch from a proposed restructure of the country’s export certification and biosecurity costs, according to David Minnis, chairman of the Australian Horticulture Exporters Association.

The Australian Government has moved the start date for the new scheme from 1 November to 1 December, according to the Weekly Times, although the final terms of the new structure have not yet been released. A proposed model, believed to be favoured by the government, would see the introduction of a three-tier system.

Under the model, a middle tier rate of A$3 per tonne would be applied to citrus, apple, pear, banana and nut exports to cover certification and biosecurity costs. A fee of A$5 per tonne would be applied to products in the third tier, which includes stonefruit, grapes and berries. The first tier is made up of commodities such as grains and forest products, and would attract a fee of A$0.20 per tonne.

Minnis said the proposed system could put smaller export categories under pressure.

“It’s in everyone’s interest to keep airfreight viable, whether it be for big or small volumes,” Minnis told the Weekly Times. “If boutique exporters are facing excessive charges then they will cease to exist.”

Minnis said the added charges would be most telling over the weekends, when suppliers are already forced to pay penalty rates to have inspectors examine their fruit.

Source:http://www.fruitnet.com/asiafruit/article/166915/australian-export-plan-delayed

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